Rangers Players and Prospects in the IIHF World Championship

The 2021 International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) World Championship took place from May 21 to June 6 in Riga, Latvia. The top 16 nations in the world participated in the tournament, which was won by Canada following a 3-2 overtime victory in the final against Finland. Teams were composed of some of the top players in the world, many of whom either played in the National Hockey League (NHL) during the 2020-21 regular season or had been drafted by NHL teams. The New York Rangers had eight players and prospects participate in the tournament, including Canadian defenseman Braden Schneider.

A 19-year-old native of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Schneider was selected by the Rangers as the 19th overall pick in the 2020 NHL Draft and spent the 2020-21 season with the Brandon Wheat Kings of the WHL. Serving as team captain, Schneider scored 27 points in 22 games. He also played two games with New York’s AHL affiliate in Hartford and represented Canada at the IIHF U-20 World Championship earlier this year. Schneider registered one assist in nine games at the IIHF World Championship.

Rangers players Kevin Rooney and Colin Blackwell – as well as prospect Zac Jones – represented the United States, which defeated Germany 6-1 in the bronze medal game. Rooney scored one point in 10 games for Team USA after registering 14 points through 54 regular season games in his first year with the Rangers. Blackwell, who also played in his first season with the Rangers in 2020-21, scored four goals in 10 games for Team USA. Jones, meanwhile, had three assists in 10 games. The 20-year-old defenseman scored 24 points in 29 games with the University of Massachusetts and four points in 10 games with the Rangers in 2020-21.

New York also had two players – center Filip Chytil and defenseman Libor Hajek – on the Czech Republic team. Chytil, who was selected by the Rangers 21st overall in the 2017 NHL Draft, scored four points through eight games in the tournament. He had 22 points through 42 games with the Rangers this season. Hajek, a 23-year-old with 77 games of NHL experience, had three points in eight games at the tournament.

The Rangers’ first-round pick, 28th overall, in the 2020 NHL Draft, Nils Lundkvist also played in the tournament. The 20-year-old defenseman represented his native Sweden and recorded an impressive five assists in only three games. His tournament was cut short after suffering what appeared to be a leg injury during a round-robin game against Switzerland.

Lundqvist won the Salming Trophy as the top Swedish-born defenseman in the SHL in 2020-21 after scoring 14 goals and adding 18 assists through 52 regular season games. He signed an entry-level contract with the Rangers on June 3.

Goaltending prospect Adam Huska also played in the IIHF World Championship. The 24-year-old Slovakian netminder appeared in three games for his country and recorded a 4.32 goals against average and .855 save percentage. Huska has mostly played with the Hartford Wolf Pack since graduating from the University of Connecticut in 2019. He was selected by the Rangers in the seventh round of the 2015 NHL Draft.

The Child’s Best Interest under New York Law

During divorce proceedings, New York State courts decide child custody arrangements based on the “best interest of the child” standard. This considers several non-weighted factors that can impact a child’s development and sense of security. Custody includes making health and education decisions for the child. If joint custody is awarded, both parents will share their caretaking responsibilities and decision-making authority evenly. 

In some cases, one parent may be provided with more responsibility than the other. In these cases, the best interest standard informs decisions regarding which parent is assigned as the child’s primary caretaker and how visitations are scheduled or outlined. An overarching factor that impacts all the other decisions involves maintaining stability in the child’s life.

If one parent has assumed most of the child-rearing responsibilities, this will be considered by the judge when deciding. The court understands that changes brought on by divorce can have a significant impact on a child’s emotional development and well-being. For this reason, judges are more likely to decide arrangements that will minimally disrupt the child’s daily life. For example, if one parent relocates after the divorce, this may affect their ability to be awarded sole custody, as the child must be uprooted to uphold this arrangement.

However, if the parents themselves have agreed to a custody arrangement, or the child is old enough to state their preferred living situation, this can also affect the final decision. Other factors may indicate that one parent is better suited than the other. If a parent has difficulty maintaining a safe and healthy home environment, or is managing an illness or mental health issue, it may be considered in the child’s best interest to stay with the more stable parent.

On the other hand, financial distress and illness alone are not sufficient grounds to deny a parent access to their child. The court does not look well at parents who interfere with visitation schedules, as this can disrupt the child’s ability to bond with the other parent. In cases where there is a documented history of abuse, either against the child or the spouse, the parent who committed the offense will be much less likely to be awarded custody. If a parent is accused of abuse during the proceedings, the court will investigate these claims. If they are discovered to be unfounded, it can hurt the accusing party’s case, as this can be interpreted as interfering with a parent’s ability to maintain a relationship with their child. 

Circumstances surrounding the children themselves are also considered. The court may examine both parents’ living arrangements to determine which situation would be best for the child. If one parent lives in a district with a superior school system, this may be a significant factor.

On the other hand, if the child has a cognitive or physical disability, the judge may award primary custody to the parent who is best able to accommodate the child’s additional needs. If either party has other children who are not directly involved in the case but are the half or full siblings of the child whose custody is in question, this can also be a deciding factor. Judges prefer to place children with their siblings, as this can provide a sense of stability.

Legislation against Puppy Mills

Puppy mills are a category of commercial breeder that prioritize profits and, as a result, do not provide adequate socialization or humane treatment to their animals. Animals born and raised in puppy mills are more likely to have genetic defects or severe illnesses. Due to the lack of socialization, dogs from puppy mills often exhibit serious behavioral problems, which can greatly reduce their chances of adoption. By some estimates, puppy mills breed more than 2 million new dogs every year, while another 3 million dogs are euthanized due to a lack of shelter space and suitable homes.

Despite all of the negative consequences of puppy mills, there is little oversight governing commercial dog breeders. The only national law that covers commercial dog breeders is the Animal Welfare Act (AWA), which falls under the jurisdiction of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). AWA is only applicable to breeders that produce a certain amount of puppies per year, and as such, it has provided a loophole for so-called “backyard breeders” to operate without any type of license or supervision.

Additionally, AWA fails to supply crucial guidelines concerning such issues as space requirements, breeding limits, and mandatory exercise and socialization. As a result, breeders can carry out practices that many would find cruel in order to maximize their profit. Further, the USDA is too understaffed and overburdened with regulating other types of animal-related activities to investigate the 3,000 licensed dog breeders operating in the United States. For this reason, many local and state governments have passed stricter legislation to improve standards for dog breeders or make it more difficult to operate this type of business.

For example, Arizona requires all commercial breeders to hold permits and be subjected to routine inspections. Failing to do so can result in a fine or jail sentence. In California, Colorado, and Indiana, breeders must also ensure that all of their animals are given time to exercise outside of their cages.

Many states and municipalities have outlawed the sale of commercially bred animals in pet shops. In California, New York, and Maryland, pet shops can only source domestic pets from animal rescues. Cities such as Phoenix, Chicago, and Beverly Hills have put similar laws in place that limit the purchase price of animals sold in pet shops. Other cities, such as Madison, Alabama, have banned puppy mills from operating within their jurisdiction, with more cities and states expected to follow suit over the next few years.

Even with more stringent regulations, puppy mills remain a profitable industry. Many breeders exploit loopholes, for example, through sending their animals out of state or selling them through a network of disreputable rescues created only to skirt the laws. For these reasons, animal rights advocates point to consumer education and behavior as the most successful ways to reduce the viability of commercial breeding practices.

Consumers should adopt animals directly from their local shelter or a specialized purebred rescue. Those committed to having a registered purebred dog should visit the breeder and tour the kennel where the animal was raised. Reputable breeders will have clean, humane facilities and will vet any potential buyers thoroughly.

The Garden of Dreams Giving Program

What Does Title Insurance Cover?

Real estate experts encourage all property buyers to purchase title insurance to protect their investments. During most real estate transactions, a title company or an attorney conducts a title search to ensure that there are no errors or debts on the property. However, even after a thorough title search, mistakes or errors can result in serious financial losses for new property owners.

Title insurance covers claims that arise after the sales transaction has closed. These claims may come from heirs or creditors who have liens against the property. Other legal issues may result from filing errors.

Title insurance for the property owner and mortgage lender costs a maximum of 1 percent of the purchase price. After the upfront payment, policyholders are covered for costs related to any of the following scenarios.

A property can be used as collateral for a loan. In this situation, the lender places a lien on the property. If the original loan holder does not pay off the loan, the balance is taken from the value of the property.

Contractors use liens to obtain payment for renovations or construction work. A failure to pay property taxes may also result in a lien. These liens are connected to the title and are transferred to the new owner when the property is sold. While liens are usually noted in public records, there are times when a lien may not be discovered until after the sales transaction is complete.

Title insurance also protects policyholders from claims on the property made by previously unknown heirs. By law, all heirs have the power to veto the sale of a property. If the seller did not notify the heirs before the sale, they may have the authority to reclaim the property. However, title insurance covers any legal expenses related to the claim fight and financial judgments to the heirs.

Errors on deeds or titles can cause difficulties for property buyers. Mistakes may appear on these legal documents due to human error, forgery, or missing papers. Since banks use this information to calculate mortgage amounts, inaccuracies can severely delay the buying process.

A common issue is a gap in the chain of title or the historical record of all previous homeowners. This can increase the chance of a property owner encountering unforeseen obstacles or errors.

Additionally, criminals can forge ownership documents for properties they do not own and sell them to unsuspecting buyers. Criminals also may use the property owner’s identity to fraudulently take out loans against the property. In either case, title insurance can protect policyholders from related financial losses.

While title insurance covers a broad range of deed- and title-related problems, some conditions are excluded from coverage. For example, financial losses due to regulations that restrict the use of a property, such as zoning laws, are not covered. Title insurance policies also do not cover legal problems caused by the policyholder. In addition, damage from fire, natural disasters, or accidents is not covered. For these reasons, property buyers are advised to purchase other forms of home insurance alongside title insurance.

What Does Title Insurance Cover?

Real estate experts encourage all property buyers to purchase title insurance to protect their investments. During most real estate transactions, a title company or an attorney conducts a title search to ensure that there are no errors or debts on the property. However, even after a thorough title search, mistakes or errors can result in serious financial losses for new property owners. Title insurance covers claims that arise after the sales transaction has closed. These claims may come from heirs or creditors who have liens against the property. Other legal issues may result from filing errors.

Title insurance for the property owner and mortgage lender costs a maximum of 1 percent of the purchase price. After the upfront payment, policyholders are covered for costs related to any of the following scenarios. A property can be used as collateral for a loan. In this situation, the lender places a lien on the property. If the original loan holder does not pay off the loan, the balance is taken from the value of the property.


Contractors use liens to obtain payment for renovations or construction work. A failure to pay property taxes may also result in a lien. These liens are connected to the title and are transferred to the new owner when the property is sold. While liens are usually noted in public records, there are times when a lien may not be discovered until after the sales transaction is complete.


Title insurance also protects policyholders from claims on the property made by previously unknown heirs. By law, all heirs have the power to veto the sale of a property. If the seller did not notify the heirs before the sale, they may have the authority to reclaim the property. However, title insurance covers any legal expenses related to the claim fight and financial judgments to the heirs. Errors on deeds or titles can cause difficulties for property buyers. Mistakes may appear on these legal documents due to human error, forgery, or missing papers. Since banks use this information to calculate mortgage amounts, inaccuracies can severely delay the buying process. A common issue is a gap in the chain of title or the historical record of all previous homeowners. This can increase the chance of a property owner encountering unforeseen obstacles or errors.


Additionally, criminals can forge ownership documents for properties they do not own and sell them to unsuspecting buyers. Criminals also may use the property owner’s identity to fraudulently take out loans against the property. In either case, title insurance can protect policyholders from related financial losses. While title insurance covers a broad range of deed- and title-related problems, some conditions are excluded from coverage. For example, financial losses due to regulations that restrict the use of a property, such as zoning laws, are not covered.
Title insurance policies also do not cover legal problems caused by the policyholder. In addition, damage from fire, natural disasters, or accidents is not covered. For these reasons, property buyers are advised to purchase other forms of home insurance alongside title insurance.

Trends Impacting the Long Island Housing Market in 2021

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In many ways, the residential real estate market in Long Island, New York, mirrors house buying trends nationwide. While open houses were paused in early 2020 due to the public health crisis, the market rebounded tremendously. Limited inventory, historically low interest rates, and the entrance of millions of millennials into the home buying market have caused home prices to rise.

When New York State lifted the ban on property visits during the summer of 2020, pent-up demand contributed to a seller’s market on Long Island. Stay-at-home orders encouraged many people living in small, expensive apartments to search for more spacious single-family homes. Families needed extra space for working at home and homeschooling their children. The desire for outdoor space also drove many New Yorkers to the suburbs. At the same time, many Long Island sellers removed their homes from the market because of economic uncertainties.

Listings in the New York City suburb of Long Island fell by a third in the wake of the pandemic. Real estate experts attribute this drop to the fears of older homeowners who do not want to downsize or remove the equity from their homes during a financial downturn.

Further, those who want to stay in Long Island worry they will not be able to secure a new property. Some experts recommend taking a short-term lease, such as an Airbnb, before reentering the real estate market. Since prices are so high, buying in this market would eat into a home seller’s profit.

The combination of increased demand and low inventory has resulted in bidding wars for available properties. Many counties saw record-breaking figures for median home prices and sales.

For example, in December 2020, median home prices in Nassau County reached an all-time high of more than $600,000, a figure that has dropped slightly since the first quarter of 2021. Between February 2020 and February 2021, median home prices in Suffolk County jumped by more than $70,000. While home sales have slowed since the high point in December 2020, sales are still much higher than before the pandemic.

Less than 1 percent of Long Island homes sold for under the listing price. Anecdotally, some agents have witnessed dozens of offers on a single property and bidding wars that pushed the sales price more than 30 percent above asking.

In addition, competition between buyers has led to sweetened deals for sellers. Some buyers are agreeing to cover all closing costs or moving expenses. Year-over-year, the average sales price of a detached home on Long Island increased by more than 15 percent. While homes spend a little more than a month on the market on average, well-located properties sell in a few days.

The housing crunch has led to the rise of another trend – buyers are turning to new-built homes due to the dearth of older homes. However, land is also in short supply on Long Island, and the high cost of construction makes this option unattainable for many buyers. However, the conditions are ideal for builders and may spur a construction boom.

The Children’s Rights Council Mediation Program

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An award-winning attorney, Marc Rovner of East Rockaway, New York, serves as director of business development and general counsel at BETA Abstract LLC. Outside of supervising the firm’s legal department, attorney Marc Rovner supports a number of charities, including the Children’s Rights Council.

Incorporated in 1985, the Children’s Rights Council works to ensure that children enjoy meaningful relationships with their parents, no matter their parents’ marital status. In addition to facilitating positive interactions between children and their parents, the organization advocates for custody reform and administers a mediation program.

CRC’s mediation program can be either a court-ordered or a voluntary process, initiated by one or both parents and guided by a neutral third party. The mediator oversees the discussion and negotiation process to provide clarity and reach a consensus that is beneficial for the child or children involved. Although not involved in decision making, the mediator can suggest solutions and help both parties ease their concerns.

Following mediation, the mediator also helps both parties in finalizing the written agreement.

A Look at the Martindale-Hubbell Marketing Network

Marc Rovner, an accomplished attorney and graduate of the Boston University School of Law, is a lifelong New York Giants fan and season ticket holder. A resident of East Rockaway, Marc Rovner works professionally as a Continuing Legal Education instructor, in addition to service as general counsel and director of business development at BETA Abstract in Oceanside.

Martindale martketing network

Over the course of his career, Mr. Rovner has claimed a number of awards through the Martindale-Hubbell legal network. These include the 2017 and 2018 Client Champion Silver Distinction Award in addition to other awards in 2015 and 2016 from other online legal resources within the Martindale-Hubbell network, which attracts more than 23 million visitors on a monthly basis. The network includes the following resources:

*Martindale-Hubbell – This resource has connected clients with attorneys since its founding in 1868 and has built more than 40,000 attorney websites to date.

*Lawyers.Com – A brand that helps clients identify top-quality attorneys via online profiles of individual lawyers and law firms. In addition, Lawyers.com provides a wide range of educational resources and content.

*Avvo – Another resource dedicated to connecting clients with attorneys, Avvo provides an attorney directory on top of profiles, reviews, ratings, an online forum, and other resources.

*Martindale-Nolo – A lead-generation service that draws on an extensive legal marketing network that includes DisabilitySecrets.com, Nolo.com, and AllLaw.com, among others.

*Martindale-Ngage – A support-focused resource that provides around-the-clock chat service for clients visiting law firms’ websites or Lawyer.com attorney profiles.

Business Development Tips for Title Insurance Companies

Attorney Marc Rovner of East Rockaway, New York, is the general counsel and director of business development at BETA Abstract LLC, a title insurance company headquartered in Oceanside. Marc Rovner has been a senior staff attorney for BETA Abstract for more than two decades. His responsibilities include managing and integrating business development in five offices and three states.

Title insurance companies require the expertise of business development representatives to implement winning strategies that will boost insurance sales.

One of these evergreen strategies is establishing an online presence. In this generation of widespread digitization and internet usage, title insurance companies cannot afford to neglect the importance of having a user-friendly website or mobile app that communicates their values and services to clients. Potential customers are increasingly relying on their internet-enabled devices to do almost everything from shopping for clothes and accessories to renting homes.

Social media and search engine optimization are also vital to improving outreach efforts. Title insurance providers should create educational and fun content around their services and promote that content widely.